National Skeet Shooting Association
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Show Me the Money

Understanding pay-outs can make registered shooting much more exciting.

When going to your first couple of registered tournaments, one of the most confusing things you’ll find yourself dealing with is how the money purses work.

Should you play them, and if so, which ones? How much do they cost, and how much can you win? Which ones should you stay away from?

This article will attempt to help answer these questions.

Cash awards are broken down into three categories:
1. MANDATORY PURSES
2. OPTIONAL PURSES
3. ADDED MONEY


MANDATORY PURSES

In a mandatory purse event, the shooter MUST pay an additional fee over and above the cost of targets and shoot administration. The extra money is paid out in prizes, and may be divided any number of different ways. An example of how a mandatory program might look is as follows:

Pay-out Table

$ 2.00 to champion, $ 8.00 remains in class, champion is not eligible for class money

3 or less in class ——– 100% to winner
4 to 7 in class ————- 60/40
8 to 11 in class ———— 50/30/20
12 or more in class ——- 40/30/20/10

In this event, the champion will win $ 2.00 from each shooter participating.

The class prizes will be determined by the number of shooters in each class. All awards will be split according to the official finish. All ties are shot off, or are determined by long runs. The champion is removed from his class and cannot participate in class money.

Example:

You’re in A class. When signing up, you pay $32.00 to shoot in the 12 gauge event. $22.00 goes towards targets and administration expenses, $ 2.00 towards the championship pool, and $ 8.00 goes into your A class pool.

Let’s assume that a total of 35 shooters have entered this event.

We’ll assume that, including yourself, 10 shooters entered in A class for this event. Your buddy, who is in the same class as you, breaks 100 and wins the event. You shot a 98, which was the second highest score of the day. Since the champion cannot win the class money, he is removed, and your 98 becomes the highest score in A class.

The money would be split as follows:

Champion $ 70.00 = $ 2.00 x 35 shooters

A class — Total purse $ 80.00 — Split 50/30/20

1st Place —- $40.00
2nd Place —- 24.00
3rd Place —– 16.00

All other classes in this event would be determined the same way.


OPTIONAL PURSES

Optional purses are separate cash pools which are run in conjunction with the regular events. They are completely voluntary. They can be played on parts or all of the shooting program. This money goes into a separate pool and is divided among the various winners who have entered. In the optional pool, all money stays in class.

Examples of the most popular options are:

  • Lewis Class
  • Class Options
  • Class 50’s (Oklahoma)
  • High Over All (HOA)

LEWIS CLASS

When all shooting has been completed, the scores are listed in numerical order, from the highest to the lowest. They are then divided into as many groups as there are classes.

For example, if there were 30 Lewis Class entries and 5 classes, there would be 6 scores in each class. The highest score in each class would be the winner. It’s the luck of the draw.

This is a good bet for a beginning shooter, because a low score has a good chance of winning. It usually costs an extra $5.00 per gauge.

CLASS OPTIONS

This is similar to the mandatory class option and differs only in that the Champion is eligible to win his class purse.

Each class has its own pool, and the purse is split the same as in the mandatory class.

This is a good option for those who feel they have a good chance of finishing high in their class. The extra cost here is also about $5.00 per gauge.

CLASS 50’s (Oklahoma)

This is an option that a shooter can play on each of the three 50-bird sub races that comprise a 100-target event.

The three bets within the gauge being shot work as follows:

  • 1st 25 targets and the 2nd 25 1 – 50
  • 2nd 25 targets and the 3rd 25 25 – 75
  • 3rd 25 targets and the 4th 25 50 – 100

The cost of this option is usually anywhere from $3.00 to $ 5.00 per sub race, per gauge. In other words, if you had played this option during the 12 gauge event, it would have cost you $ 9.00 or $ 15.00. If you play this option in a four gauge event, at a cost of $ 5.00 per sub gauge, it will cost $ 60.00.

Each sub race of 50 targets is a separate pool, and you can win in all three pools, or just on one or two parts, depending on how well you shoot each series of 50 targets.

This option is usually played in the larger gauges by shooters who are confident they will break 50 – 75 – or 100 straight targets. The smaller gauges are usually played by the more experienced shooters.

Each class has its own separate series of pools.

HIGH OVERALL (HOA)

This option is based on the total score shot in all gauges for a particular event. It could be 200 targets for a one-day event, or 400 targets based on a 4-gun, 2-day event. This option combines the shooter’s total score for all gauges, and the winner could take all, or the purse could be split, depending on the number of shooters who’ve entered into the pool.

This option is usually played by the more experienced shooters, unless a handicap system is used.

This option is sometimes built into the cost of the mandatory purse and can also played as a separate option.


ADDED MONEY

This represents additional money, solicited by the host club, from outside sources, to entice a larger and more prestigious turn-out at its event. No extra fee is charged to the shooters. It usually enlarges the cash awards for the champions of each event and can add extra winnings to the class champions as well.

Just remember, each club has its own different versions of these various options. They may change the percentages, costs, and methods of payouts.

When signing up, make sure to ask the cashier to explain any options you don’t fully understand.

There are many more types of options not mentioned in this article. Make it a habit to familiarize yourself with the different types as you travel from club to club. Even though you’re not playing them now, you will, as you gain more confidence in your abilities.

By Barry Greenberg