National Skeet Shooting Association
National Skeet Shooting Association



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High Five Blues

Because it is an incoming target, high 5 should present a minimum amount of trouble for most skeet shooters.

Sometimes you’ll feel as if you have all day to break this bird. However, the longer you track the target across the field, the more problems you’re likely to encounter. By riding the target too far, you run the risk of shooting behind, as well as over, this seemingly easy target.

Keep in mind, a skeet choke has its optimum pattern at 20 to 25 yards. Projecting this out to the flight of the target, the ideal area to break this bird is between five feet before to five feet past the target crossing point. (The Center Stake while it is still rising. If you wait any longer, the target has already begun to drop.)

However, shooting the bird in the correct area doesn’t guarantee a broken target. Many shooters fail to realize this target requires one of the longest leads on the field. It’s not uncommon to see shooters fire at the target in the correct area, but shoot well behind it.

To avoid doing this, the shooter will start tracking the target further across the field, thinking it’s an easier shot as it gets closer. But the truth is, by this time the target is dropping and is often missed by shooting over it.

So what’s the answer?

First, make sure to break the target in the “Sweet Spot”, which is approximately five feet before, or after, the target’s crossing point. (The Center Stake)

Secondly, assuming you are shooting the target using sustained lead, pull away from the target another 8 to 12 inches just as your about to pull the trigger. This will add the extra lead necessary to break this target if shooting behind has been your problem. Make sure to stay slightly below the target when doing so.
By Barry Greenberg