National Skeet Shooting Association
National Skeet Shooting Association



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Solving a Problem Can Be Easy

We all know there are basic shooting positions when first learning the game of skeet.

These basics are divided into three shooting fundamentals. They are:

a. Stance
b. Gun hold
C. Eye Placement
Over time we are able to develop our own skills by varying these basic shooting fundamentals to suit our own style of shooting. By being able to repeatedly break targets, we reinforce our conviction that our shooting program is successful.

Sooner or later no matter how well you’re shooting, a problem will develop on a station you’ve never had trouble with before. How you go about solving this problem is extremely important, for if not handled properly, it could affect performance on other stations.

Before correcting the trouble you first must determine whether it’s a physical or mental problem.

If it’s a mental problem don’t try correcting it by making changes in your physical program. This type of trouble is more likely to be solved by making adjustments in your mental approach.

But suppose it’s the fault of some type of physical problem?

Many skeet shooters feel it’s counterproductive to change any part of their shooting program to correct problems. Their theory is “Shoot your way out of it.” Others prefer to make exaggerated or extreme changes in their shooting fundamentals to eliminate their troubles. But most prefer varying degrees of change somewhere in between.

However, I’ve found the quickest way to find the cause, as well as the cure, is by going back to the three basic fundamentals. What must be kept in mind as you strive to overcome these types of problems is that rarely will the changes required to fix them be drastic. Usually, they will be subtle, and very slight. The trick is to determine which of the three basics need adjustment.

Start with your stance first. See if making small changes in foot positions alleviates the problem.

If this helps, GO NO FARTHER! Don’t try anything else.

If it doesn’t, try making slight changes in your gun hold positions.

If the problem still exists, try working on focusing your eyes in a slightly different area.

Chances are, by following this step-by-step approach you’ll eventually find the solution to your problem without drastically changing your shooting routine.
By Barry Greenberg